Flannel Friday: The Mouse and the Apple

Good morning! Friday is here again! Where did the week go?

Here’s a flannel I made a long time ago for The Mouse and the Apple by Stephen Butler. This is a simple reiterative story that is actually great for storytime as is: the story isn’t too long and the illustrations are bright and clear. However, I made it into a flannel to take to my daughter’s preschool class so they could play with the pieces and retell the story.

The story is there’s a sweet, sweet apple high up on the tree and Mouse is waiting patiently for it to fall. Other animals come along and are NOT so patient. The goose flaps its wings at the tree, the goat butts the trunk, etc. No one gets the apple to drop and they all decide it must be bitter and they take off. Mouse keeps waiting patiently and sure enough, the apple falls and Mouse has a fabulous snack.

To make the flannel pieces, I just photocopied the illustrations from the book. The tree has one green leaf missing because that’s where the apple goes!

I think for this winter I will make a pine tree with snow on it, and Mouse can be waiting for an icicle to fall!


Flannel Friday round up at Mary’s place today! Find it at Miss Mary Liberry. Hosting schedule and past round ups are at Anne’s So Tomorrow. Get a visual overview of all the Flannel Friday posts plus lots more inspiration at our Pinterest account!

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18 Responses to Flannel Friday: The Mouse and the Apple

  1. Sarah says:

    Cute flannel board. I have seen this book before, but I don’t have it on my list for mouse or apple storytimes. I am going to add it right now and your link so I can make a flannel board to use sometime soon. I love the idea about the icicle. Thanks!

  2. marfita says:

    This is so cute! Or a chipmunk could be waiting for a pine cone. I almost said squirrel, but the squirrel would just climb the tree.
    The castle in the middle of the moat is drying in the craft/storytime room right now. I did some outlining and little touches with fabric paint. It’s absolutely adorable.

  3. Anne says:

    I love the idea to chance the story slightly for different seasons. Very cute.

  4. sharon says:

    this is one of my favorites… and I think it’s the post I’m doing next Friday. The shapes are similar to the ones we have here… must be from the book. I’ll say yours is in much better shape! Just seeing it makes me happy.

  5. Cindy says:

    This flannel looks so cute! The book, sadly, is going to be hard to get. Would you be willing to e-mail me and let me know what the cow and the chicken do to get the apple?

  6. Charlotte says:

    I use this book every Fall for an apple storytime. Thanks for sharing your flannel. How did you do the animals’ eyes?? Are those wiggly eyes or a drop of glue with a pen mark?? This turned out darling. Thanks for sharing.
    Charlotte
    Thousand Oaks Library
    cburrows@tolibrary.org

  7. Melissa says:

    Hi everyone! Thanks for all the love! Marfita: I almost suggested a blossom for springtime! You could do the pine tree again for the pinecone, or make fall-colored tree and wait for an acorn, too. (PS, I would LOVE to see the castle!! Post a pic please!) Cindy: I don’t have the book here at home but I will try to get a hold of a copy next week. I am thinking that the cow stomps the ground and the chicken makes a lot of loud clucking noises, but it’s too fuzzy. Maybe someone else can chime in before then? Maybe Sharon or Charlotte, if they have it in on hand? Charlotte, for the eyes, I put on my OCD hat and made teeny tiny felt circles, then made the dots with a skinny Sharpie. I love the idea of a drop of glue, though–does a Sharpie mark on that? I’ll have to try! I always meant to glue on a piece of gray yarn for Mouse’s tail, but never did.

  8. Andrea says:

    Great flannelboard! This story is new to me & would have been perfect for my storytime this week!

  9. Library Lady says:

    How is it that I don’t know this book and that none of our branches have it?
    I think your description is enough for me to tell this with puppets or something, along wtih “What Will It Rain?” about a squirrel waiting for acorns. Perfect–thank you!!

  10. Library Lady says:

    Well, most of it. The ending isn’t there. But I think I can fake that :D

  11. Melissa says:

    Yeah, after they all wait for the apple then they all take a turn trying to make it fall. THEN they leave and the apple drops and Mouse eats it. It’s a pretty basic nursery tale structure! It’s an older book, and we don’t have it in our circ collection any more either. I think I better buy a used copy online just for safekeeping! It would be good with puppets!

  12. Cindy says:

    Thanks all! I actually had a mouse theme planned next week, sooo…

  13. Library Lady says:

    I have ended up with a whole batch of stories about mice and apples. Going to save “What Will It Rain” for next week and just concentrate on the mice!

  14. Pingback: Apple-y Delicious Redux | Rain Makes Applesauce

  15. atompilot says:

    I took the same story and laminated the pictures.

    With a blackboard and magnets I presented the story to the kids and then got the kids into groups where they could present the story themselves to the class.

    The kids learn a lot about patience through this lovely story + its in the real (?ts a change to TV or playstation..ipad..etc.).

    This year I have turned it into a drama/play for the kids and combined it with the song- ‘An Austrian went yodeling’.

  16. Mary Ferris says:

    I’ve had to come up with an alternative to felt eyes because those little white circles just disintegrate in my fingers. If wiggle eyes don’t look right on the figure what works for me is to make them with paper and glue them on the felt.

  17. Melissa says:

    Good workaround! Thanks for sharing it.

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